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The USA’s First Dark Sky Reserve Is Set To Be Unveiled In Idaho

Star light, star bright.

Truly dark, starry skies are becoming harder and harder to come by, with research from Science Magazine suggesting 80 per cent of the world’s skies are affected by light pollution. However, there are still some spots around the globe with skies so clear you can appreciate the Milky Way’s most intricate details.

The newest spot for next-level stargazing is in Idaho, North America, boasting some of the most pristine skies the country has to offer. Although there are other Dark Sky Parks dotted across the US, the 3600 square kilometres of land is one of the few remaining areas in the US large enough to attain “reserve” status.

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The new distinction will be bestowed on the lands by the International Dark Sky Association, which preserves areas like this one for educational and scientific purposes, as well as for the enjoyment of the public.

If sitting back and marvelling at the universe’s most stunning natural beauty is your idea of a good time, Jasper National Park in the Canadian Rockies is hosting a Dark Sky Festival in October. Apart from incredible woodlands, soaring mountains and turquoise lakes, Canada is home to uninterrupted and expansive star-filled skies.

The Jasper Dark Sky Festival will run from October 13 to 22, and features everything you want in an astronomy festival: live music, space talks from astronomy experts and stellar star-filled skies.

And, if you’re seeking an incredible opportunity to experience some of the world’s clearest night skies a little closer to home, you’re in luck. In rural Central Western NSW, just 30km south of Coonabarabran, Australia’s astronomy capital, you’ll find Warrumbungle National Park, Australia’s first Dark Sky Park.

Before settling in for a night of watching the skies, you can take advantage of the beautiful hiking tracks Warrumbungle National Park has on offer.

Book your next adventure with Qantas.

(Lead Image: Bureau of Land Management / Flickr)