Inspire

The US Is Introducing A Bunch Of New High-Speed Train Routes

When you consider the speed of the trains in places like Japan and China, it seems wild that in 2018 we’re still boarding ones that max out at the same speed of our cars. Soon in the United States you won’t have to, with a massive overhaul to Amtrak’s Acela service in the country’s Northeast Corridor.

Making your way around the US will soon get a whole lot speedier.

The upgrade will also see four new major routed planned to be built over the next decade. Here’s what you can expect in the future for high-speed train travel in the United States.

 

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Las Vegas to Southern California

XpressWest — the privately-owned rail company — has had a high-speed train route connecting Las Vegas and California in under two hours in the works since 2005.

But earlier this year, a seperate private rail company, Brightline Trains, acquired the project with plans to have it connecting Vegas to Victorville, California and a city in the outskirts of Los Angeles fully operational by 2022.


Miami to Orlando

The line, which opened to run along Florida’s east coast earlier this year has already cut the travel time between Miami and Fort Lauderdale from 90 minutes in traffic to just 30 minuted by train.

The line is expected to extend to Orlando International Airport by 2021.


San Francisco to Los Angeles

California‘s high-speed rail project has been bumpy to say the least, having been plagued with growing costs and political opposition.

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But when it’s completed in 2033 it could cut the travel time between San Fran and Los Angeles by six or more hours.


Houston to Dallas

Any tracks are yet to be laid, but the privately-owned Texas Central Partners could begin construction by 2019 to connect Dallas and Houston via a 90-minute high-speed route  — the drive currently takes four hours in traffic.

Check out Qantas flights and begin your next adventure.

(Lead image: Danial Abadia / Unsplash)