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Flat-Earthers Are Sailing A Cruise Ship To The “Edge Of The World”

The earth is, famously, round. But somehow, several people work tirelessly every day to convince us that it’s actually – you guessed it – flat. So despite the fact that the earth is a sphere, a globe, a big round ball floating in space, a group of flat earthers is organising a flat earth cruise to sail to the edge of the flat earth to prove that it is, in fact, flat.

Let’s think back – it’s the 6th century BC, and ancient Greek philosophers are speculating that the earth is a sphere. Jump forward a bit more, and we’ve measured the earth’s circumference, proving that it is, most definitely, a sphere.

And now jump forward to the present day when the Flat Earth International Conference has announced their plans for a massive cruise ship to take travellers to the edge of the world.

Literally to the edge of the world – the FEIC believe that the earth is a flat disc with a towering ice wall around the rim that holds the ocean back, and the cruise is destined for this wall.

A proposed model of the flat earth, which the flat earth cruise will probably not prove correct.

The FEIC are very excited about the scientific revelations that this cruise may bring, calling it “The biggest, boldest, best adventure yet”. So I guess we can forget all about the 1519 Magellan voyage that we previously believed was the first around-the-world trip.

The Flat Earth Cruise has been announced for 2020 but we’ll have to wait for more details, including whether we’ll be able to book a spot on the ship or whether it’s reserved for, and I use this term loosely, “scientists”.

Until we get more details, we’re also unsure how the flat earth cruise will navigate to the ice wall, since nautical navigation and GPS work thanks to technology that’s been built on the data that the world is round.

There are plenty of other, better cruises that you can book right now, even a cruise with a rollercoaster on deck.

Check out Qantas flights to begin your next adventure.

(Lead image: NASA. Featured image: Composite of flat earth image from Wikimedia Commons and night sky from Unsplash)