Inspire

Try Not To Gag Over The Exhibits At The Disgusting Food Museum

A trip to the museum is a perfect way to fully immerse yourself in all things history, art and culture – a way to feel educated and inspired by the human experience.

Unless of course you’re visiting Sweden’s Disgusting Food Museum. The place where you’re much more likely to feel nauseous than inspired.

The museum is the brainchild of Samuel West and Andrea Ahrens, both of whom are completely fascinated by disgusting food from across the globe. And we’re not talking mouldy bread or rotten eggs, the stuff they’ve sourced is truly and utterly rank.

Disgusting Food Museum

Casu marzu, a maggot-infested cheese from Sardinia, on display at the Disgusting Food Museum in Sweden.

It’s purpose, however, isn’t just to gross you out. “The museum aims to help people question their basic assumptions about food,” curator and chief disgustologist Samuel West told Lonely Planet. “If disgust is cultural and contextual, then it is also changeable”. What better way to prove this theory than creating a space for foul foods?

Disgusting Food Museum

Licorice, on the tame end of the displays at the Disgusting Food Museum.

Opening on Monday, October 29, the Disgusting Food Museum will showcase 80 of the world’s foulest foods, including but not limited to casu marzu (a maggot-infested cheese from Sardinia), surströmming (fermented herring from Sweden) and durian (the infamously stinky fruit from Thailand).

Disgusting Food Museum

Century eggs, a preserved food from China, at the Disgusting Food Museum.

Reckon you could hack it? It’s amazing the things you can see, learn and, erm, smell, while travelling. For more information, or to find out how you can check out the collection visit the Disgusting Food Museum website.

Check out Qantas flights and begin your next adventure.

(All images: Disgusting Food Museum. Lead image: Kale Pache, or boiled sheep’s head.)