Eat & Drink

A Definitive List Of The Best Dim Sum Restaurants In Hong Kong

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This feature is brought to you by Qantas, who are proud to play a part in bringing travellers together with the people they love from around Australia and across the globe.

Dim sum or yum cha… whatever you call it, the one thing we can all agree on is Hong Kong is one of the best places in the world to enjoy it. Though originally hailing from Guangzhou, the Hong Kong locals have transformed it from a meal into a cultural phenomenon.

The moment that wonky dinner trolley wheels into view, your heart skips a beat wondering what deliciousness hides inside its teetering stack of bamboo baskets. Is it mouth-watering shumai, steamed prawn dumplings in wonton wrappers? Could it be barbeque pork buns, fluffy and juicy? Or is it a custard-filled lai wong bao? Half the fun is the surprise.

Rather than spend your time wandering from one dim sum restaurant to the next, we’ve done the leg work (and possibly put on a few kilos in the process) to bring you a definitive guide of the best dim sum restaurants Hong Kong has to offer. You can thank us later.

Cheap & Amazing

Tim Ho Wan

 

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The Michelin Star is one of the world’s most prestigious dining awards. It’s a sign of quality, of flavour, and, most of the time, it’s a sign that you also need a healthy bank balance just to walk in the front door. But, that’s not the case at Tim Ho Wan, a Michelin-rated dim sum restaurant that proves Michelin dining can be cheap and delicious at the same time.

Their baked pork puns are the stuff of legend – fluffy, juicy, and melt-in-your-mouth tasty – and one of the reasons why they’ve expanded their footprint beyond little old Mong Kok. Sham Shui Po, Central, and Olympic are just a few of the areas you can now get your fix.

A typical dim sum session here will set you back as little as HKD$200 (approximately AUD$35).

Lin Heung Tea House

 

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Don’t be fooled by appearances. Though Lin Heung Tea House may look a little basic, décor-wise, the food this iconic dim sum restaurant pumps out is amazing. Founded in 1926 and relocated to the current site in the ‘80s, this local favourite is always full of eager diners.

Finding a spare seat can be a bit like musical chairs but, once you’ve found a spot, it’s worth the wait. The Tea House offers more than 30 kinds of dim sum including har gow (prawn dumplings) and shumai. The real star, though, is dai bao (a fluffy chicken bun served with mushroom and salted yolk inside), of which they only make around 100 per day.

There’s no English on the menu, so pack your sense of adventure (or peek in the baskets). Rumours are swirling the restaurant may not be around for much longer, with the current site possibly earmarked for a redevelopment, so try to get in while you can.

Prices start at around HKD$14 (approximately $2.50) per dish.

Mid-Range But Worth It

Yum Cha Central

 

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Not content with creating delicious food that satisfies our hunger pangs, YUM CHA Central has gone one better, serving classic Cantonese dishes with a playful Insta-ready twist. BBQ piggy pork buns with pink snouts, eyes and ears, doggy sausage rolls… it’s all amazing.

Though you’d be forgiven for assuming the food could be just style over substance, the flavours are just as authentic as anywhere else in the city. Beyond these few novelty items, the rest of the menu is more traditional, yet their presentation game is still on point.

After your group has taken turns to snap a few photos, just split your chop sticks, lick your lips, and get ready for a flavour explosion.

Speaking of explosions, you must try their most famous dish – the vomiting custard bun. Don’t let the name or appearance fool you, though, these sweet, hot custard buns are worth the trip to Hong Kong alone.

A serving of three vomiting custard buns can be yours for just HKD$49 (approximately AUD$8).

Start Saving Now

Duddell’s

 

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Part restaurant and lounge bar, part modern art space, Duddell’s counts banks, diamond merchants, and foreign embassies among its neighbours, so that should give you a fair idea of what to expect. But the yum cha is just so good that we can’t leave it off the list.

Aside from the a la carte menu of classic Cantonese dishes, their all-day yum cha menu includes favourites such as shrimp dumplings with matsutake mushrooms, fungus dumpling with black truffle, and a soft-boiled quail egg and pork dumpling served with caviar.

Dishes range from HKD$68 (approximately AUD$12) up to around HKD$128 (approximately $23).

Dim sum starts as early as 5am in some parts of the city, so, any time of day or night, wherever you find yourself, chances are there’s a dim sum restaurant within each reach.

 

(Lead image: @yumchahk / Instagram)

Qantas flies daily to Hong Kong from Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane*. Book your next Hong Kong adventure at qantas.com.

*Flight schedule subject to change.

Brought to you by Qantas

This feature is brought to you by Qantas, who are proud to play a part in bringing travellers together with the people they love from around Australia and across the globe.