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You Can Now Stay In Some Of Japan’s Beautiful Iconic Castles

Castle accommodation is maybe the ultimate in cool places to stay. Not only are you staying in a beautiful old building, but you get a taste of history, too. We’ve covered some of Airbnb’s best castle stays in the past, but now Japan is in on the act, with some of the country’s instantly recognisable buildings opening their own castle accommodation.

The first is Ōzu Castle, on the banks of the Hijikawa River in Ehime Prefecture in Japan’s south. Guests will stay in the tower of Ōzu Castle, which was originally built in the 1300s, but was partly destroyed in the centuries after, being rebuilt to its former glory in 2004.

 

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Your hosts will pull out all the stops to welcome you, with a gun salute welcome, dancing, and a luxurious meal. Reservations are open from April, just in time for cherry blossom season, and can take up to six people.

Be aware though that the castle stay doesn’t come cheap – it’s ¥1 million (AU$13,762) for two people per night plus tax, and an extra ¥100,000 (AU$1,376) per extra guest.

 

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The other historic site soon to be available as castle accommodation is located in Hirado on a island of the same name in Nagasaki Prefecture, also in the south of Japan. Bookings open from July this year for a stay in Hirado Castle, allowing you to stay in one of the castle’s turrets – the main building hosts a fascinating museum which you’ll want to peruse during your stay. Prices haven’t yet been announced for this castle stay, but Stay Japan is currently running a competition for up to five groups to stay at Hirado Castle.

There’s a lot going on in the travel sector of Japan in 2020, in the lead up to the Tokyo Olympics in July. Check out this Pokémon hotel room, or this KFC all-you-can-eat buffet, and these bubble tea and Nintendo theme parks (this one features full-size Mario Kart, no joke).

(Lead image: As6673 / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0))