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You Could Fill One Of 180 Job Roles In Antarctica If You’re Sick Of The Mainland

Ready for a new job that’s so cool, it’s downright chilly? How about a four to 18-month gig in Antarctica? Right now, the Australian Antarctic Division is looking for 180 roles to be filled, which are mostly trade-based.

Yup, that’s right, you could get overseas, leave the germ-ridden Covid world behind, and work amongst the polar bears.

Australia has three year-round research stations in Antarctica: Mawson, Casey, Davis. There’s also one more on sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. On top of this, remote field bases help support operations during summer.

“We’re looking for mechanics, plant operators, carpenters, electricians and plumbers as well as broader station support roles such as chefs, communication specialists and station leaders,” Australian Antarctic Division HR Manager Maree Riley told Sunrise.

You won’t see a lot of people, with each station having 40 to 100 employees (called expeditioners) over summer, and just 15 to 20 during winter. Apparently you really won’t be able to go home until your contract is complete, either.

Take fair warning from someone who spent six-months working and living at a hotel in the middle of a National Park with only about 40 people — even if you get a great group you can sometimes want to hit them very badly after being cooped up together like that.

You salary will depend on the role, obviously, but will typically be between $60,000 to $100,000 a year. This is especially good when you add to that free rent and board, with all your meals prepared by a chef. Not to mention a special $60,000 a year bonus on top of that base wage, to “recognise the demands of living and working in this isolated environment”, according to Riley.

I honestly couldn’t be bothered doing the maths on this, but guys that’s a LOT of money going straight into the bank. It’s not like you’ll have anything else to spend it on while you’re there — except maybe this hotel.

If you’re still with us, and a stint in glacial wilderness sounds like a dream, then get ready — Riley says the vetting procces is pretty rigourous.

“We need to ensure they have the technical skillset to do the job that they’ll be doing in Antarctica… We also need to make sure that they are medically fit, psychologically fit and have the personal qualities that we require of somebody living in a small, isolated and remote community”.

For everyone else, there’s always this scenic Qantas day flight.

(Lead Image: Twitter /@AusAntarctic)